Packing Checklist - 'Cause Life's a Trip

Welcome to Packing Checklist! Whether you're packing for an overnight trip or a multi-month excursion, we have a packing checklist to help you plan and prepare for your travels.

Motion Sickness Treatment Alternatives for Your Packing Checklist

Whether you’re travelling by car, train, air, or boat/ship, motion sickness can strike at any time. You may want to include motion sickness treatment on your packing checklist.

Motion sickness may pass quickly, or even cease when the motion stops, but what if it’s a long trip, and the motion sickness doesn’t go away?

Symptoms may include nausea, dizziness, or even vomiting or diarrhea.  Luckily, for you and your trip, there are actually several motion sickness treatment alternatives.

Motion Sickness Pressure Bands / Bracelets

Motion sickness wrist bands work by acupressure as a drug-free alternative to treat nausea.  Many prefer motion sickness wrist bands because they are reusable.

As a non-ingestible solution, there are no concerns about drowsiness or other side effects.  As such, the wrist bands are a good alternative for children and pregnant women.

Medication

If drugs are an option, the old standby,Dramamine (dimenhydrinate), and other brands of motion sickness medication such as Bonine (meclizine) or Benadryl (diphenhydramine) are available over the counter.  Pills (tablets or capsules), chewables, and patches are all conveniently available for your needs.  There are even motion sickness meds for dogs.

Be careful to follow manufacturer’s instructions regarding use and dosage as drowsiness is a common side effect.  Consult your doctor (or vet) for clinical advice.

Ginger

Various forms of ginger root are commonly used to treat nausea and gastric issues.  If you prefer a natural motion sickness treatment alternative that is ingestible (rather than pressure bands), multiple ginger products are available including gum, candy, tea, or pills/capsules.

Other Motion Sickness Advice

If you know that you or a member of your party is prone to motion sickness, you may take precautions such as eating light before traveling and including saltine crackers on your packing checklist.  If the problem is more serious, you may want to purchase a pressure band, medication, or ginger product.  These products CAN also be used before the onset of symptoms.

Hiking First Aid Kit Packing Checklist

First Aid Kit For HikersFirst Aid Packing Checklist for Hikers

Hiking is all about light weight, judicious packing.  Whatever you carry on your hike, you’re going to carry the whole time, so you don’t want to carry a whole lot of items that take up a lot of space or weigh more than necessary.

For hiking, or any other activity where size and weight are factors, your first aid kit packing checklist should be concise.  Pack only the items you might need.  Pack only the quantities you might need, and eliminate any items you can while maintaining a safe first aid kit.

(The downloadable and printable version of the Hiker’s First Aid Kit Packing Checklist can be downloaded here.)

First Aid Kit, Hiking

  • Light weight container (box, bag, etc.)
  • Absorbent Compress dressing/gauze
  • Moleskin for blister treatment and prevention
  • Adhesive bandages (assorted sizes)
  • Blanket (super light and compact space blanket)
  • Over the counter medications in minimum quantities (use tiny jewelry baggies to pack single doses and eliminate bulky bottles)
    • Aspirin/Regular Strength Pain Medication/Anti-inflammatory painkillers
    • Antihistamine/Benadryl
    • Anti diarrhea medication
    • Etc.
  • Epinephrine auto injector (Epipen)
  • Antiseptic/Antibiotic Ointment
  • Individually wrapped antiseptic wipes
  • Compact section of duct tape

pack medication in dry bagsHikers might also consider putting first aid items in dry-bags or tiny zip-lock baggies to protect them from the weather or environment.  (Download the printable PDF version of the First Aid Kit, Waterproof Packing Checklist here.)

You can purchase dry-bags at most hunting, outdoors, or sporting goods stores.  Sealable baggies of multiple sizes are available in the jewelry section of your local hobby store.

For quick access to all the downloadable and printable pdf packing checklists, check out the PackingChecklist.net Downloads page.

Waterproof First Aid Kit Packing Checklist

SCUBAWhy Waterproof?

Why would you want a waterproof first aid kit?  In addition to primitive campers, hikers, backpackers, and extreme outdoor sportsmen who need to keep gear safe from the weather, there are literally hundreds of water sports like kayaking, canoeing, and rafting that often take you on adventures in the middle of nowhere. 

These adventures are an absolute blast, but accidents can happen to beginners and experts alike.  A packing checklist for a waterproof first aid kit can help you stay safe on land and in the water.

Light Weight and CompactKayaking

For most outdoor and water sports, the first aid kit should be relatively light weight and compact.  If you’re in a large touring canoe or kayak, you might have room for a larger kit, but space is still limited.  More importantly, you don’t want to reach for an aspirin to find that it dissolved from all the water hours ago.

Keep your first aid kit packing checklist concise and pack only the items you might need.  Pack only the quantities you might need, and eliminate any items you can while maintaining a safe first aid kit.  …and put each item in dry-bags or tiny zip-lock baggies.  (Download the printable PDF version of the First Aid Kit, Waterproof Packing Checklist here.)

tinybaggiesYou can purchase dry-bags at most hunting, outdoors, or sporting goods stores.  Sealable baggies of multiple sizes are available in the jewelry section of your local hobby store.

 

 

 

First Aid Kit, Waterproof

  • Light weight container (Dry Bag or Dry Box)
  • Absorbent Compress dressing/gauze
  • Moleskin for blister treatment and prevention
  • Waterproof adhesive bandages (assorted sizes)
  • Chamois or compact swimmer’s towel
  • Blanket (super light and compact space blanket)
  • Over the counter medications in minimum quantities (use tiny jewelry baggies to pack single doses and eliminate bulky bottles)
    • Aspirin/Regular Strength Pain Medication/Anti-inflammatory painkillers
    • Antihistamine/Benadryl
    • Anti diarrhea medication
    • Etc.
  • Epinephrine auto injector (Epipen)
  • Antiseptic/Antibiotic Ointment
  • Individually wrapped antiseptic wipes
  • Compact section of duct tape

 For quick access to all the downloadable and printable pdf packing checklists, check out the PackingChecklist.net Downloads page.

Office First Aid Kit Packing Checklist

Office First Aid Kit Packing ChecklistSooner or later, someone in the office is going to need a band-aid.  Depending on the environment, you could need much more, so in addition to quick access to 9-1-1, every office, department, or work area should maintain a sufficient First Aid Kit.  The Office First Aid Kit Packing Checklist identifies the most common items that should be included.

For a static location, such as an office, the Office First Aid Kit Packing Checklist can simply match the Comprehensive First Aid Kit Packing Checklist.  A few items may differ relative to the location or environment, but the following items are included on the Office First Aid Kit Packing Checklist (downloadable and printable PDF).

First Aid Kit, Office

  • Sufficiently large container (box, bag, etc.)
  • Absorbent Compress dressing/gauze
  • Roller Bandage 3” (individually wrapped)
  • Roller Bandage 4” (individually wrapped)
  • Elastic bandage
  • Triangular Bandage
  • Sterile Gauze Pad 3×3
  • Sterile Gauze Pad 4×4
  • Cloth adhesive tape
  • Adhesive bandages (assorted sizes)
  • CPR Breathing Barrier
  • Instant Cold Compress
  • Gloves, disposable, non-latex
  • Scissors
  • Thermometer
  • Tweezers
  • First Aid Instruction Booklet
  • Aspirin/Regular Strength Pain Medication/Anti-inflammatory painkillers
  • Antihistamine/Benadryl
  • Epinephrine auto injector (Epipen)
  • Antiseptic/Antibiotic Ointment
  • Hydrocortisone Ointment
  • Aloe vera gel
  • Antiseptic Wipes
  • Alcohol pads
  • Hand sanitizer
  • Saline
  • Lighter
  • Penlight
  • Cotton balls/swabs
  • Duct tape

For quick access to all the downloadable and printable pdf packing checklists, check out the PackingChecklist.net Downloads page.